P-40N-5-CU 42-105861


I'm currently trying to sort out the info I have concerning this P-40, and will update this page
as the sorting progresses. But at the moment, here's what I know... or what I think I know:

This P-40N is owned by John Fallis and is touted as being a 'genuine combat vet' and as having
served with the 49th FG. It's my understanding that this Hawk is actually a composite, with parts
from at least two or three airframes. The three serials associated with this restoration are 42-104959,
42-105526, and 42-105861, with most of the major components apparently having come from '959' and '861'.

Based on the digging I've done so far, I'm inclined to say that all the airframes listed above, or should
I say the wreckage of these airframes, was recovered from New Guinea in the early to mid 1970s by David
Tallichet and that they were initially held at Tallichet's place in Chino, California. (Yesterday's Air Force)

I have come across an account which indicates that Tallichet may have donated one of these airframes to
Louisiana State University around 1980 or so and that it eventually wound up in the hands of a local museum
before being acquired by John Fallis for this restoration. However... another account suggests that the LSU P-40
had been in the University's possession for quite some time prior to 1980. So there is a point of confusion.

I have no doubt that Mr. Fallis acquired the LSU P-40 from the aforementioned museum (USS Kidd Veteran's Memorial
in Baton Rouge) and that he also acquired parts of at least two other airframes, I simply am not certain as to
which was which... I *think* the LSU P-40 was 42-104959, but am just not sure.

Now, this Hawk has often been referred to as being serial number 42-104959. But as is known, components
from other airframes were used during the restoration and it is the serial of one of these, 42-105861, which
appears on the tail of this Hawk. I do not know which provided the greater number of parts for the restoration,
'959' or '861', but I'm swimming against the current here and identifying this Hawk as the latter.


If anyone can provide more info about this Hawk, or confirm/correct any of the above, please contact the webmaster.


Regardless of its origins, this is a beautifully restored Hawk. I'm fortunate to have seen it once... and happy to
have been able to get the early morning photos you see below. I hope to have the same opportunity again...




Here's how this 'ole gal looked in the early morning hours on Saturday during the 2008 Geneseo Airshow. Her first
post-restoration flight took place only a few months prior, and I believe that this was her first public display.



S. Donacik photo


S. Donacik photo


S. Donacik photo


S. Donacik photo


S. Donacik photo


S. Donacik photo


S. Donacik photo



Back to 'Survivors'